Intercultural studies to introduce certificate, five new Asian-American courses in fall2 min read

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Caden Zhao, Reporter

Intercultural studies to introduce certificate, five new Asian-American courses in fall
Intercultural Studies is broadening its course offerings in Asian American Studies with five new courses and a new certificate starting in Fall 2020 under the department of Asian American and Asian Studies.
Mae Lee, head of ASAM and intercultural studies professor, expects to see more students at De Anza College register in Asian American and Asian studies, which she has taught for 21 years.
“When I came to college, it was the first time I was introduced to a wide and variety of Asian Americans and other students of different ethnic backgrounds,” she said. “Then I learned about the overlooked history of Asians in the United States not from class, from other students.”
The history of Asian American and Asian studies, at De Anza College and other colleges across the U.S., came out of the social movement and students’ protest in the 1950s. The 11 courses offered this fall at De Anza College are originally derived from ethnic studies.
The 11 courses include five new courses: Asian-Americans and Racism, Asian-Americans and American Ideals, Institutions, and Politics, The U.S. and Asia, Asian-Americans Make Culture, and Introduction to Filipinx American History and Culture.
In Lee’s class, Asian American Experiences Past to Present, she said she has heard many different stories of Asian-American students facing discrimination and prejudice. This class focuses on the less known history of Asian Americans.
Asian-Americans have reported over 1,700 reports of xenophobia and racist attacks to San Francisco State’s online report center, as of May 13.
“The xenophobia against Asians is not new,” Lee said. “In the history of America, there are many kinds of anti-Asian movements. Asians were thought to be yellow peril, a dangerous threat from the outside.”
Lee said that the way that the U.S. has handled relations with Asian countries has led to negative effects for Asian-Americans.
“I can’t foresee whether the situation will better or worsen,” she says.

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