DASB Senate candidates reach out to students, receive mixed reception2 min read

Nathan Mitchell, News Editor

About 30 students gathered as members of the United and Revolution coalitions and three independent candidates outlined their platforms and fielded questions at Meet Your Candidates Day in the main quad May 15.

Ryan Royster of United said his coalition’s campaign focused on transparency and accountability to students.

Stacie Rowe, the presidential candidate for Revolution, said her coalition’s tenets included greater student access to campus resources and helping underserved students.

Cassandra Clay, Newsha Salehi and Karla Xitalli Navarro, the three independent candidates, each said they wanted to avoid partisan politics and represent themselves.

Student trustee-elect Anita Adams, who ran unopposed, said she would fight against the 50 cent transaction fee charged by Higher One, and would faithfully represent the student body while serving on the Foothill-De Anza Board of Trustees.

Several candidates advocated harmony in the senate after the elections.

“I don’t believe in politics. We’re a college. This isn’t Obama v. Romney,” said Newsha Salehi, independent. “Once elected, we’re going to be friends in the senate.”

“To have a community within our school we need a community within our senate,” said Karla Navarro, independent.

The atmosphere remained civil despite candidates exchanging comments via a shared bullhorn. Thaddeus Jordan-United and Cassandra Clay-independent, shared a brief yet cordial conversation as they gladhanded students at the end of the event.

“They (the coalition members) are very passionate about what they do, which is a quality you want in senators,” said Pearl Holmes, a 19-year-old nursing major.

Both Holmes and Rodolfo Vigdor, a 19-year-old psychology major, described the United coalition as containing more incumbent senators. Holmes said she viewed the Revolution coalition as new people challenging the current senate.

Vigdor said he thought all candidates make promises that they may not fulfill once elected.

“I feel like whoever I vote for, things will end up the same,” Vigdor said. But he said he will still vote.

The online election runs between Monday, May 20, and Sunday, May 26.

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