Library displays controversial literature

Kevin Coleto, Staff Reporter

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In honor of Banned Book Week, an annual event by the American Library Association (ALA), De Anza has set up a display of controversially banned books in the campus library, organized by faculty members and librarian Pauline Yeckley.

“It’s a functioning display, meaning any student is free to go ahead and check out any of the books if they wish,” said Lena Chang, also a librarian at De Anza Library.

Every year, the ALA compiles a list of books, current and classic, that have been challenged or banned in school districts across the U.S. for their themes relating to sensitive topics such as racism, sexism or self-harm.

In order to raise awareness about censorship of literature, De Anza has been following the ALA in its initiative to bring banned books the spotlight they deserve. It has been a tradition at De Anza to celebrate Banned Books Week, typically staged during the last week of September.

“Librarians and teachers alike are participating in this celebration, to fight against the censorship of information and to assert our freedom to accrue knowledge.” said Jessica Silver-Sharp, an adjunct librarian at De Anza Library. “People often take for granted the availability of books, so we need a reminder once in a while that access to them is a privilege.”

“Librarians and teachers alike are participating in this celebration, to fight against the censorship of information and to assert our freedom to accrue knowledge.” ”

— Jessica Silver-Sharp

This list of banned books ranges from classics such as To Kill A Mockingbird (Lee Harper) and Catcher in the Rye (J.D. Salinger), to contemporary works like the recently turned Netflix motion-picture, Thirteen Reasons Why (Jay Asher), among other titles.

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