The voice of De Anza College since 1967

Breaking stereotypes as a male cheerleader

December 4, 2016

Not everyone can handle being the focal point of a team, but Julio Alfaro can.

A 20-year-old music major, Alfaro is the co-captain of the cheer team and the only male cheerleader at De Anza College.

With more than a year as a cheerleader, he’s shown his capacity to lead.

According to a 2015 survey by the National Federation of State High School Associations, about 2 percent of cheerleaders are male.

“Being a male cheerleader isn’t really easy,” Alfaro said. “You get a lot of attention on you because you are the only male cheerleader, which happened to me [in] high school.

Alfaro said he’s always put in the center of the team.

“When it comes to stunting at De Anza, you’re the base. You’re the person that lifts up the whole group.”

“It was originally a male sport and I feel that [guys] are strong bases. Even if they aren’t [in] the leadership role, they can still take other important roles.”

Though new to the role of co-captain, Alfaro leads the cheerleading team to do their best.

He said his main priorities are motivating the cheerleading team and the players at the games they attend.

“I really try to push myself and my team,” he said.

Alfaro said there’s pressure on him because his team expects the most from him. Alfaro has to note the cheers, lead them through dances, guide them through the game and essentially be perfect.

Even though the task is tough, Alfaro said that he has learned about unity, staying together and helping each other.

He has learned how to not only be in the middle of the team as dance support or leader, but also as a friend.

“Not everyone can be a good leader but everyone can be good to each other,” said Alfaro.

Alfaro said there’s pressure on him because his team expects the most from him as the main base.

Alfaro has to note the cheers, lead them through dances, guide them through the game and essentially be perfect.

Even though the task is tough, Alfaro said that he has learned about unity, staying together and helping each other.

He has learned how to not only be in the middle of the team as dance support or leader, but also as a friend.

“Not everyone can be a good leader but everyone can be good to each other,” said Alfaro.

Alfaro said his biggest challenge was adjusting to De Anza’s cheerleading team, since it is based more on dancing rather than stunting, in contrast to most cheerleading teams.

Alfaro is currently planning to transfer to a school that has a music major degree.

Despite wanting to continue cheer, Alfaro said it might be difficult because of his height.

“Some universities have cheerleading requirements that I don’t fit, unfortunately, but if there’s a cheer team that would take me, I’ll definitely try out,” Alfaro said.

Although the sport is still predominantly female, Alfaro invites any male who wants to cheer to join: “The more the merrier!”

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

LA VOZ NEWS • Copyright 2017 • FLEX WordPress Theme by SNOLog in