Veterans honored at De Anza ceremony2 min read

Samantha Jill UyBico, Staff Writer

De Anza Student Veterans Association celebrated Veterans Day on Nov. 5 in an on-campus ceremony with special guest speakers.

The Main Quad was filled with the sounds of the De Anza Wind Symphonic Orchestra who ushered in the ceremony with an instrumental version of the national anthem.

Miguel Rendon, De Anza Student Veterans Association president, was the first to speak.

He thanked everyone for attending the ceremony and reminded the crowd to honor our veterans for their work.

The other speakers were veterans honoring those who have fought in the past as well as the present.

Diana Brady, retired Navy Chaplain, asked the crowd for a moment of silence for the troops: those who have lost their lives or are currently one of the 10,000 stationed in Afghanistan.

“We must honor our veterans, as well as thank them,” Brady said, reminding attendees of what has been done for our country.
The most memorable guest speaker was retired Maj. Gen. Eldon Regua, U.S. Army.

Regua was the only veteran present who came clad in full uniform, and he opened up his speech with a humorous anecdote about asking if people knew who he was, and a disabled elder veteran telling him “If you don’t know who you are, then check with the front desk. They’ll know who you are.”

“We are here not to mourn, but to celebrate. Not with sorrow, but with joy. The patriotic spirit has spread,” said Major General Regua.

Other speakers to touch the podium for the ceremony were retired Army Officer and English professor John Swennson, DASB Senate Representative Mia Hernandez, and Edwin T. Tan, PH. D Deputy District Director who was filling in for Congressman Mike Honda.

Multiple speakers at the ceremony informed the crowd that the proper time to celebrate Veterans Day is specifically on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month, so there was a separate celebration on November 11 at 11a.m. at the Cupertino Veterans Memorial across the street from campus.

The overall message of the ceremony was to honor our veterans and never forget what they have done for the United States of America. Our freedom has come at the price of hard work, and sometimes lives, from our brave veterans.

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