Brown’s unit cap vetoed2 min read

Carla Arango, Staff Writer

California Community College students will no longer have to worry about paying four times the current $46-per-unit price for tuition thanks to the veto of Gov. Jerry Brown’s 90-unit cap proposal.

Earlier this year, Brown sought to limit the number of units students can earn at community colleges as part of his proposed state budget for 2013-14.

According to the budget, the cap was meant to encourage students to finish their two-year education quickly and to advance to a four-year university or employment.

The proposal was also meant to limit the number of times a student can repeat a course in hopes of obtaining a better grade, according to the budget.

But the unit cap would have made it more difficult for students close to that limit to transfer on time or to maintain financial aid.

“Sometimes I can’t get the classes I need so I have to take alternative classes … just to meet the full-time requirements in order to keep my financial aid,” said Krithi Byadgi, 19, a political science major.

“All these unnecessary classes would add up to more than 90 units, which would make it all the more difficult for me to transfer.”

The cap would have affected many De Anza College students who need financial aid and are close to reaching 135 units, those who are double-majors and students who changed their major.

“I am working on a certificate program along with my A.A. degree in business administration (at De Anza),” said Nupur Mehta, 18.

“This automatically increases the number of classes I will need to take in order to fulfill the A.A. degree, certificate program and the extra classes I need to take to get into the private colleges.”

Both the Assembly and Senate budget committees rejected the proposal.

“The administration proposal simply sticks it to students who have already had to contend with fewer classes and massive fee increases,” assembly budget chair Bob Blumenfield told the Sacramento Bee.

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